Connecticut LASIK Laser Cataract Eye Surgery Blog Doctor & Associates

Monday, March 23, 2020

Eye Exams & Diagnosing Alzheimer’s


A recent study published by Duke University researchers in the journal Retina suggests that an observed loss of blood vessels in retina may reflect changes in brain health and could signal Alzheimer’s disease. In people with healthy brains, microscopic blood vessels form a dense web at the back of the eye inside the retina. In the eyes of people with Alzheimer’s disease, that web was less dense and even sparse in places. The differences in density were statistically significant after researchers controlled for factors including age, sex, and level of education. The study measured blood vessels that can’t be seen during a regular eye exam using noninvasive technology that takes high-resolution images of very small blood vessels within the retina in just a few minutes, called Optical Coherence Tomography-Angiography (OCT-A). They concluded that it’s possible that these changes in blood vessel density in the retina could mirror what’s going on in the tiny blood vessels in the brain, perhaps before we are able to detect any changes in cognition. 

With nearly 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and no viable treatments or noninvasive tools for early diagnosis, its burden on families and the economy is heavy. Scientists at have studied other changes in the retina that could signal trouble upstream in the brain, such as thinning of some of the retinal nerve layers. The goal would be to use this technology to detect Alzheimer’s early, before symptoms of memory loss are evident, and be able to monitor these changes over time in participants of clinical trials studying new Alzheimer’s treatments.

Please mention any concerns you have about Alzheimer’s during your regular eye exam. To learn more about new technology and examination techniques we are using, please just ask us at your scheduled appointment. You may schedule an eye exam at Doctor & Associates-203-227-4113, visit Doctor & Associates in Fairfield County, or facebook.com/doctorandassociates to make an appointment.

Doctor & Associates offices are conveniently located at 129 Kings Highway North, Westport, Connecticut 06880, 195 Danbury Road, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 and 148 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.          

Monday, March 16, 2020

Cataract Risk, Diet & Health


The Blue Mountains Eye Study showed that carefully following dietary guidelines decreased risk of visual impairment. However, whether or not this association extends to age-related cataract was not clear. So, researchers have now reported on a study to determine if strict adherence to dietary guidelines, using total diet score, impacted the incidence of age-related cataract. Using complex statistical analysis of the Blue Mountains Eye Study, the found that adhering to dietary guidelines and total diet score by itself was not associated with incidence of any cataract, BUT as total diet score increases with a Body Mass Index (BMI)<25, there is an association with lower risk of nuclear cataract which is a known aging marker.

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Doctor & Associates-203-227-4113, visit Doctor & Associates in Fairfield County, or facebook.com/doctorandassociates to schedule an appointment.

Doctor & Associates offices are conveniently located at 129 Kings Highway North, Westport, Connecticut 06880, 195 Danbury Road, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 and 148 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.          

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes


#1 Pink eye only happens in young children. While young kids are known for getting pink eye, due to close contact in day care centers, so can teenagers, college students, and adults-especially those who don’t clean their contacts. The best way to keep pink eye from spreading is to practice good hygiene, including washing your hands, not touching your eyes, and using clean towels and other products around the face.
#2 Antibiotics are necessary to cure your child’s pink eye. Antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat pink eye. There are three types of pink eye: Viral, Bacterial & Allergic Conjunctivitis. Most cases are caused by viral infections or allergies and do not respond to antibiotics. Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis depending on severity. Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis usually resolve on their own within 7 to 14 days without treatment.
#3 Sun is bad for your eyes. While it’s true that long-term exposure to the sun without proper protection can increase the risk of eye disease, some studies suggest sun exposure is necessary for normal visual development. Children who have less sun exposure seem to be at higher risk for developing myopia or nearsightedness. Just make sure they’re protected with UV-blocking sunglasses and sunscreen.
#4 Blue light from screens is damaging children’s vision. Contrary to what you may be reading on the internet, blue light is not blinding you or your screen-obsessed kids. While it is true that nearsightedness is becoming more common, blue light isn’t the culprit. In fact, we are exposed to much more blue light naturally from the sun than we are from our screens. The important thing to remember is to take frequent breaks. Use the 20-20-20 rule: look at an object at least 20 feet away every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.
#5 Vision loss only happens to adults. The eyes of a child with amblyopia (lazy eye) may look normal, but this eye condition can steal sight if not treated. Amblyopia is when vision in one of the child’s eyes is reduced because the eye and brain are not working together properly. Strabismus (crossed eyes) is another eye condition that can cause vision loss in a child. Strabismus is when the eyes do not line up in the same direction when focusing on an object.
#6 All farsighted children need glasses. Most children are farsighted early in life. It’s actually normal. It doesn’t necessarily mean your child needs glasses because they use their focusing muscles to provide clear vision for both distance and near vision. Children do need glasses when their farsightedness blurs their vision or leads to strabismus. They will also need glasses if they are significantly more farsighted in one eye compared with the other, a condition that puts them at risk of developing amblyopia.
#7 There is no difference between a vision screening and a vision exam. While it’s true that your child’s eyes should be checked regularly, a less invasive vision screening by a pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist, optometrist, orthoptist, or person trained in vision assessment of preschool children is adequate for most children. If the screening detects a problem, the child may need to see an ophthalmologist or other eye care professional. A comprehensive exam involves the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil, enabling a more thorough investigation of the overall health of the eye and visual system.

If you or some you know has questions about children’s eye problems or would like to learn more about children’s vision please call Doctor & Associates-203-227-4113, visit Doctor & Associates in Fairfield County, or facebook.com/doctorandassociates to schedule an appointment.

Doctor & Associates offices are conveniently located at 129 Kings Highway North, Westport, Connecticut 06880, 195 Danbury Road, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 and 148 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.          

Monday, February 10, 2020

Laser Treatment Can Be First Choice for Glaucoma

Researchers reporting in The Lancet on the LiGHT Study concluded that a change in the clinical practice pattern of how we treat glaucoma should be implemented so that glaucoma laser treatment was a first choice treatment, rather than eye drops which is the typical approach to glaucoma treatment. The LiGHT Study compared eye drops to glaucoma Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) treatment in terms of lowering intraocular pressure, health related quality of life, cost and cost effectiveness. The data was gathered and analyzed and concluded that Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT) should be offered as a first-line treatment for open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension, supporting a change in clinical practice.

If you or someone you know is at risk for glaucoma, has ocular hypertension or is being treated for glaucoma, please be certain you have regular eye exams with glaucoma testing to prevent vision loss. Ask your eye doctor about treatment options such as SLT for glaucoma when you schedule your exam at Doctor & Associates-203-227-4113.

Doctor & Associates offices are conveniently located at 129 Kings Highway North, Westport, Connecticut 06880, 195 Danbury Road, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 and 148 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.         

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Deep Learning & Macular Degeneration Risk Assessment


Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in seniors. Aging is the greatest risk factor! In its most advanced stages, it can deprive an individual of his or her ability to perform basic activities such as reading, recognizing faces, and driving. Approximately 11 million individuals are affected with AMD in the United States (U.S.) alone and the prevalence of AMD in the U.S. is anticipated to increase to 22 million by the year 2050.

Early detection and treatment is critical in helping patients avoid vision loss from AMD. Recently researchers reported interesting results in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology regarding how “deep learning” (DL) or artificial intelligence (AI) might be a useful addition to the physician in the examination and monitoring process for patients at risk for AMD and its progression. Their findings suggest that using DL to grade and monitor AMD is comparable to experienced humans for estimating 5-year risk of progression to advanced AMD. This could be very helpful in assisting physicians in having a detailed risk assessment in the long term care of AMD patient.

If you want to learn more about your risk of age related macular degeneration (AMD), schedule an eye exam at Doctor & Associates-203-227-4113.

Doctor & Associates offices are conveniently located at 129 Kings Highway North, Westport, Connecticut 06880, 195 Danbury Road, Wilton, Connecticut 06897 and 148 East Avenue, Norwalk, Connecticut 06851.